From the editors of Penguin Books and Penguin Classics

“As you see, my dear Sophie, I am as good as my word, and not spending all my time on frills and furbelows; I shall always have time for you.”

Choderlos de Lacos, Dangerous Liaisons


Monday First Lines | Every Monday, we offer the opening sentences of a Penguin Classic to start the week.

“But I have too deeply enjoyed the voyage, not to recommend any naturalist, although he must not expect to be so fortunate in his companions as I have been, to take all chances, and to stat, on travels by land if possible, if otherwise on a long voyage. He may feel assured, he will meet with no difficulties or dangers (excepting in rare cases) nearly so bad as he beforehand anticipated. In a moral point of view, the effect ought to be, to teach him good-humoured patience, freedom from selfishness, the habit of acting for himself, and of making the best of every thing, or in other words contentment. In short he should partake of the characteristic qualities of the greater number of sailors. Travelling out also to teach him distrust; but at the same time he will discover, how many truly goodnatured people there are, with whom he never before had, or ever again will have any further communication, who yet are ready to offer him the most disinterested assistance.”

Charles Darwin, Voyage of the Beagle


Friday Final Lines | Every Friday, we offer the closing lines of a Penguin Classic to finish up the workweek. 


Wow. The trailer for Ron Howard’s In the Heart of the Sea surfaced (HA!) today and it’s spectacular. Just to recap: this is a movie based on a National Book Award-winning history (Nathaniel Philbrick’s In the Heart of the Sea); based on gripping first accounts, one of which was only discovered in the 1980s (Chase and Nickerson’s The Loss of the Whaleship Essex, Sunk by a Whale); that inspired one of the greatest novels ever written (Moby-Dick). If that’s not good pedigree, what is?

 We were thrilled to see Penguin Random House author Richard Flanagan win the Man Booker Prize for Narrow Road to the Deep North, and even more so because his book draws attention to a great classic. As spring turned to summer in the year 1689, the Japanese writer Matsuo Basho embarked on a foot journey that has inspired poets and pilgrims for centuries. His account of a five-month walk through Edo Japan is at once a collection of haiku by the acknowledged master of the form and a wondrous travelogue that brings to life a countryside in new bloom. 
On choosing to borrow Basho’s title, Flanagan wrote, “Basho, the great Japanese haiku poet wrote a haibun—a sort of nature travel journal that combines haiku and prose— with this title. His Narrow Road to the Deep North is a high point of Japanese culture. The Death Railway is a low point of that same culture.” 
 

 We were thrilled to see Penguin Random House author Richard Flanagan win the Man Booker Prize for Narrow Road to the Deep North, and even more so because his book draws attention to a great classic. As spring turned to summer in the year 1689, the Japanese writer Matsuo Basho embarked on a foot journey that has inspired poets and pilgrims for centuries. His account of a five-month walk through Edo Japan is at once a collection of haiku by the acknowledged master of the form and a wondrous travelogue that brings to life a countryside in new bloom.

On choosing to borrow Basho’s title, Flanagan wrote, “Basho, the great Japanese haiku poet wrote a haibun—a sort of nature travel journal that combines haiku and prose— with this title. His Narrow Road to the Deep North is a high point of Japanese culture. The Death Railway is a low point of that same culture.” 

 

As seen in the New Yorker. File under THIS IS ACTUALLY HAPPENING AND IT’S THE COOLEST THING EVER. And they don’t even mention the fact that Elizabeth Bradley is going to lecture on Irving and Kanye West. Get your tickets here.

As seen in the New Yorker. File under THIS IS ACTUALLY HAPPENING AND IT’S THE COOLEST THING EVER. And they don’t even mention the fact that Elizabeth Bradley is going to lecture on Irving and Kanye West. Get your tickets here.

Check out what’s new to Penguin Classics in September!

Confucius, The Analects

Confucius never wrote any books, but his disciples compiled his essential thoughts. The Analects is one of the most influential books in Chinese history, and it remains so to this day. Whether you’re a longtime fan or a first time reader, Annping Chin’s new translation is the perfect place to start. It’s an incredibly lucid translation, interwoven with Professor Chin’s enlightening commentary. And this edition also features the Chinese text, so bonus points for that.

Washington IrvingThe Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Other Stories

It’s Halloween season. And it’s also Fall TV season, which means the endlessly entertaining Sleepy Hollow is back. So we asked our Irving expert Elizabeth Bradley to help put together a new edition of Irving’s great work. (Why should you love Bradley? For starters, she’s giving a lecture next week on Washington Irving and Kanye West.) Classic stories like “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” remain haunting and timeless, but Irving’s sketches of early American landscapes and culture are no less enjoyable.

The Penguin Book of Witches

A history of witchcraft in America and England through primary sources…what’s not to like? We’ll leave it to editor Katherine Howe (author of the The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane and Conversion) to describe why you have to check this out:”I think we can all agree that witches are a problem. Okay, you’re right. Maybe they’re not a problem anymore. Perhaps you think witches are awesome. Perhaps you know a witch or two yourself. Perhaps you are a witch yourself? But if witches today wear their pointy hats with impunity and walk amongst us twirling their wands and trailing cats in their wake in broad daylight, it’s safe to say that it wasn’t always so.” 

classicpenguin:

classicpenguin:

It’s Drop Caps Day! This isn’t a joke. X, Y, and Z are on sale today, and we’re giving away a full twenty-six book set to celebrate. Because we love Drop Caps and we love our readers. (US/CAN only — sorry international readers, we really do love you too!)
Click the image or click here to enter! Good luck and don’t forget to share your Drop Caps photos with us so we can re-post some of our favorites!

This is still open for another week, so don’t sleep on your chance to win!

Only two days left to enter!

classicpenguin:

classicpenguin:

It’s Drop Caps Day! This isn’t a joke. X, Y, and Z are on sale today, and we’re giving away a full twenty-six book set to celebrate. Because we love Drop Caps and we love our readers. (US/CAN only — sorry international readers, we really do love you too!)

Click the image or click here to enter! Good luck and don’t forget to share your Drop Caps photos with us so we can re-post some of our favorites!

This is still open for another week, so don’t sleep on your chance to win!

Only two days left to enter!

“You don’t know about me, without you have read a book by the name of ‘The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,’ but that ain’t no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly.”

Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn


Monday First Lines | Every Monday, we offer the opening sentences of a Penguin Classic to start the week.

“In the dark apartment my father alone was awake, wandering silently through the rooms filled with the singsong of sleep. Sometimes he opened the door of the flue and looked grinning into its dark abyss, where a smiling homunculus slept forever its luminous sleep, enclosed in a glass capsule, bathed in fluorescent light, already adjudged, erased, filed away, another record card in the immense archives of the sky.”

Bruno Schulz, The Street of Crocodiles


Friday Final Lines | Every Friday, we offer the closing lines of a Penguin Classic to finish up the workweek.