From the editors of Penguin Books and Penguin Classics

“She looked up and across the barn, and her lips came together and smiled mysteriously.”

John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath


Friday Final Lines | Every Friday, we offer the closing lines of a Penguin Classic to finish up the workweek. 

classicpenguin:

The Great Black Spine Giveaway is here! Spread the word!
We’re giving away 150 of our black spine Classics, randomly selected for your enjoyment. Think of this as spring cleaning/huge thanks to all our social media followers for being so wonderful. Click here or click through the image to enter! (US/CAN only, contest ends 4/21.)

Still plenty of time to enter! Our apologies to everyone outside of US/CAN, we still love you!

classicpenguin:

The Great Black Spine Giveaway is here! Spread the word!

We’re giving away 150 of our black spine Classics, randomly selected for your enjoyment. Think of this as spring cleaning/huge thanks to all our social media followers for being so wonderful. Click here or click through the image to enter! (US/CAN only, contest ends 4/21.)

Still plenty of time to enter! Our apologies to everyone outside of US/CAN, we still love you!

How do we Know our eBooks are not being Altered?

yeahwriters:

ebookporn:

 “I recently uploaded The Queen of Hearts (a collection of novels written in the 1850s) by Wilkie Collins to the MR library. As well as changing ‘gayety’ to ‘gaiety’ and ‘gayly’ to ‘gaily’ I also changed ‘gay’ to ‘light-hearted’. I did this because the English language has changed in the last 150 odd years. In our day ‘a gay man’ would almost certainly be read as ‘a homosexual man,’ and this is simply not what Collins meant – he would have used a different term if he had dared to mention a character’s sexual orientation at all. I did add a note to the posting that I had updated spelling and hyphenation – I also changed ‘to-day’ to ‘today’ for example.”

I am still unsure how I feel about this. ~ eP

Wtf? Why would someone change the original text?? Anyone with half a brain/education knows that until less than 100 years ago, “gay” meant “happy”. Are we supposed to cut up every other classic work and replace their “outdated” words with modern ones? Language evolves, and people who read books written a long time ago are perfectly aware of this. If it’s a 160+ year old book that people are still reading, I’d imagine that the author was very intentional with his/her word choice, and for someone to alter them later on when converting the text to a format that may be widely disseminated is a travesty.

This made me really angry.

Not to be overly promotional or self-aggrandizing, but here’s something worthy of a comment. The article says, There are no gatekeepers, no one to make the judgement call if this is best practice.” In truth, we like to think of ourselves a bit as gatekeepers here. Project Gutenberg and other free services for getting public domain books serve a fantastic role and vital role, but at the end of the day when you pay for a Penguin Classic (or Oxford, Norton, Modern Library, etc., etc…), you pay for the services of an editor at Penguin and an academic editor who has taken the time to ensure that you’re getting an authentic text, whether it’s in print or eBook. That why you’ll almost always find a “Note on the Text” in our books explaining all the sources and editorial decisions. Turn back to our “Joan Eyre” situation a few months back if there are any doubts about how seriously both we and our scholars take this—we live and breathe this stuff here!

“I think The Grapes of Wrath was the first novel I ever believed in entirely, whole-heartedly.”

Garrison Keillor

Throughout the week over at The Penguin Blog, we’ll have more thoughts on Steinbeck’s masterpiece from some of his most loyal readers (including Keillor, and a post today from the director of the National Steinbeck Center, Colleen Bailey).

The Great Black Spine Giveaway is here! Spread the word!
We’re giving away 150 of our black spine Classics, randomly selected for your enjoyment. Think of this as spring cleaning/huge thanks to all our social media followers for being so wonderful. Click here or click through the image to enter! (US/CAN only, contest ends 4/21.)

The Great Black Spine Giveaway is here! Spread the word!

We’re giving away 150 of our black spine Classics, randomly selected for your enjoyment. Think of this as spring cleaning/huge thanks to all our social media followers for being so wonderful. Click here or click through the image to enter! (US/CAN only, contest ends 4/21.)

nprbooks:


Men stood by their fences and looked at the ruined corn, drying fast now, only a little green showing through the film of dust. The men were silent and they did not move often. And the women came out of the houses to stand beside their men — to feel whether this time the men would break. The women studied the men’s faces secretly, for the corn could go, as long as something else remained.

John Steinbeck’s Dust Bowl masterpiece The Grapes of Wrath turns 75 today, and our own Lynn Neary has an appreciation of the book here.
If you’ve been following along with us as we read the book, our final meeting is this afternoon at 3pm EDT over on Monkey See with Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.  Please join us!

Just one hour until Susan Shillinglaw is live! Our resident Steinbeck expert, and author of On Reading the Grapes of Wrath, it’s always a joy to read and learn alongside Professor Shillinglaw (check our her great PW piece on Steinbeck from last week). For those that haven’t yet had the opportunity, this is a great chance to talk about Steinbeck’s masterpiece with one of the people that knows it best.

nprbooks:

Men stood by their fences and looked at the ruined corn, drying fast now, only a little green showing through the film of dust. The men were silent and they did not move often. And the women came out of the houses to stand beside their men — to feel whether this time the men would break. The women studied the men’s faces secretly, for the corn could go, as long as something else remained.

John Steinbeck’s Dust Bowl masterpiece The Grapes of Wrath turns 75 today, and our own Lynn Neary has an appreciation of the book here.

If you’ve been following along with us as we read the book, our final meeting is this afternoon at 3pm EDT over on Monkey See with Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.  Please join us!

Just one hour until Susan Shillinglaw is live! Our resident Steinbeck expert, and author of On Reading the Grapes of Wrath, it’s always a joy to read and learn alongside Professor Shillinglaw (check our her great PW piece on Steinbeck from last week). For those that haven’t yet had the opportunity, this is a great chance to talk about Steinbeck’s masterpiece with one of the people that knows it best.

chicagopubliclibrary:


“You’re bound to get idears if you go thinkin’ about stuff.”

On April 14th, 1939 Viking Press published The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. 
Happy 75th birthday to a classic! 

chicagopubliclibrary:

“You’re bound to get idears if you go thinkin’ about stuff.”

On April 14th, 1939 Viking Press published The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. 

Happy 75th birthday to a classic! 

(via libraryjournal)

“To the red country and part of the gray country of Oklahoma, the last rains came gently, and they did not cut the scarred earth.”

John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath, published seventy-five years ago today.


Monday First Sentences | Every Monday, we offer the opening sentences of a Penguin Classic to start the week

“Finished this day—and I hope to God it’s good.”

On October 26, 1938, Steinbeck finished writing The Grapes of Wrath, and with characteristic humility and modesty, recorded his hopes for the book. This is the last entry in his diary of the novel (found in Working DaysThe Journals of The Grapes of Wrath). On Monday, we celebrate the novel’s 75th anniversary. How very true his hopes were.


Friday Final Lines | Every Friday, we offer the closing lines of a Penguin Classic to finish up the workweek.